First wave of Flooded House Museum opening

Levees.org founder Sandy Rosenthal at proposed Flooded House Museum at London Avenue Canal east breach. Photo credit/Cheryl Gerber

WHEN: Wed August 22 at 9:30 a.m.
WHERE: 4918 Warrington Drive, New Orleans

At the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Levees.org will unveil Phase One of its proposed Flooded House Museum in the Filmore Gardens neighborhood of New Orleans.

City Councilman Jared Brossett, District D has confirmed attendance.

For a limited time, visitors can view the artistic rendering of a typical family room in New Orleans – filled with music and love – the day before the levees broke.

The unique project required a special permit from the City Planning Commission converting a once flooded residence 400 feet from the London Avenue Canal east breach site into an educational memorial.

Like a diorama, the exhibit will be visible through the windows.

A tent will protect the press conference attendees from sun and rain.
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Army Corps responds to Levees.org’s demand for transparency

As revealed this month, the Army Corps of Engineers gave the East and West Levee Authorities a grade of “minimally acceptable” for their levee maintenance every year since Katrina.

The revelation got a lot of press; two stories in the Times-Picayune, two stories by WWL-TV and one in the Advocate.

It was Levees.org who obtained the data in a FOIA request and brought it to the press.

The Army Corps, while legally required to make the data public, had placed it on a website that was difficult to navigate.

And we just learned that the Army Corps – in response to Levees.org’s demands for transparency – had uploaded supporting documents from 2014 onto its website.

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Flashback: Levees.org installs its first historic plaque

In collaboration with the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans, Levees.org installed its first historic plaque at the Fifth Anniversary of the Worst Civil Engineering Disaster in US history.

The location was the 17th Street Canal levee breach site. This breach is considered by experts to be, on its own, the single most damaging breach.

On August 18, 2010, Levees.org’s first historic plaque – vetted and fact checked by the Louisiana Office of Historic Preservation – was unveiled in front of news video cameras and reporters from all over the nation.

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