Levees.org unveils its first Louisiana State Historic Plaque

17 year old Doyle Cooper plays the trumpet in closing the Plaque Dedication Ceremony. Photo by Judi Bottoni

Under a blazing sun, Levees.org unveiled its first Louisiana State Historic Plaque at Ground Zero of the 17th Street Canal levee breach in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans.

The informational plaque is adorned with the beloved state bird, the brown pelican, and to the delight of the audience today, three of the graceful birds alighted atop the floodwall directly behind the new plaque during the ceremony.

The ceremony began with piper Marta Vincent who played “Amazing Grace.”

Many elected officials attended the solemn event including New Orleans City Council President Arnie Fielkow, and Vice President Jackie Brechtel Clarkson and City Councilwoman Susan Guidry. Mayor Mitch Landrieu sent one of his senior advisors, Scott Hutcheson to say a few words on behalf of the Mayor. Also present was Representative Nick Lorusso.

Sandy Rosenthal founder of Levees.org spoke a few words before unveiling the plaque. Everyone read the words aloud together. It was an emotional moment.

Actor Harry Shearer, director of The Big Uneasy joined the Ceremony and spoke a few words.

The ceremony closed with the trumpet music of 17 year old Doyle Cooper who performed a beautiful rendition of “A closer walk with thee.”

This Historic Plaque is the first of many. Levees.org will hold fundraisers to raise the money for plaques at other breach sites in New Orleans and St. Bernard Parish.

Click link for photo gallery:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/24669697@N05/sets/72157624630239767/

One response to “Levees.org unveils its first Louisiana State Historic Plaque”

  1. Nick Manix says:

    I’m so happy that there is something letting people know what really happened. I’d still like to know what happened to the $854 million donated by other countries. I know that the United Methodist Church got $66 million of it and paid out $13 million in salaries to their employees in 2006. But I think that with close to a billion dollars, 5 years and little hurricane activity, there should have been more improvement.

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